The Naming of Soapland

In 1951, the first Turkish baths began to be offered in Japan.  By 1956, they’re offering “special services,” which begins to attract government attention.  By 1960, customers can get sex while visiting a Turkish bath.  These Turkish baths are essentially happy ending baths, and by the 1980s, they have millions of customers a year.

However, the Turkish embassy in Tokyo began receiving calls from inquisitive customers about prices and reservations.  Once the Turkish embassy realized what mix-up, they complained to the Japanese government, until, in 1985, the 110 members of the trade association of Turkish bathhouses came up with a plan for a new name that would apply to all of them.  To come up with the name the held a nationwide contest.  About 2200 suggestions were submitted, and the new name chosen was Soapland.  Today, these facilities still exist in Japan, offering customers the chance to be cleaned by a beautiful women, along with the satisfaction of other needs.

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The First Meeting and Marriage Between a Daughter of Japan and a Son of the West

The first time Westerners reached Japan was in 1543, when two Portuguese men were blown off course near China and landed on Tanegashima, a small island off the southern coast of Kyushu.  The lord of the island, Tanegashima Tokitata, was impressed by the Portuguese harquebuses, primitive guns.  He ordered his chief sword smith to copy them, but he was unable.   The man, Kiyosada, offered his daughter in exchange for technical assistance.  He had supposed the liaison would be temporary, but the two fell in love and married.  The daughter left with the men, but they later returned to the island, bringing a Portuguese gunsmith, finishing the initial bargain.  And so from the very first time Westerners met the people of Japan, there has existed love between us.